Ohio

"Critical Analysis" in Ohio

Like a zombie in a horror film, the "Critical Analysis of Evolution" effort returned to haunt the Buckeye State, despite a series of stakes through its heart. In 2002, Ohio adopted a set of science standards including a requirement that students be able to "describe how scientists continue to investigate and critically analyze aspects of evolutionary theory" (see RNCSE 2002 Sep/Oct; 22 [5]: 4–6). When the indicator was introduced, it was widely feared that it would provide a pretext for the introduction of creationist misrepresentations of evolution.

The Evolutionary Wars in Ohio

by Trisha Gura Reprinted from the HHMI Bulletin, September 2002, pages 24-27. ©2002 Howard Hughes Medical Institute

The Ohio Board of Education had a big problem. Two years ago, a Fordham Foundation study had slapped the state with an "F" for the way it taught evolution in the classroom. In fact, state standards lacked any mention of evolution in the science lessons for Ohio students, kindergarten through high school. Embarrassed, the state legislature mandated that the board revise the standards by the end of 2002.

Ohio Scientists' Intelligent Design Poll

A poll of scientists' opinions on "intelligent design", commissioned by the University of Cincinnati and Case Western Reserve University, was presented in October, 2002. Here are the results:

Internet Public Opinion Laboratory
Department of Political Science University of Cincinnati

By: George Bishop, PhD Professor of Political Science Director Internet Public Opinion Laboratory Department of Political Science University of Cincinnati (513) 556-5078

Ohio's Battle against Creationism

The Evolutionary Wars in Ohio gives an insightful report on a long fight over science standards in Ohio as the situation stood in the Fall of 2002.

Analysis of the Discovery Institute's Bibliography takes a close look at the misleading bibliography submitted to the Ohio Board of Education.

Stop the Ohio anti-science bill

Ohio's HB 597 poses a threat to students and science education throughout the Buckeye State. Ohioans must reach out to their legislators now to urge that the anti-science provisions be blocked or removed.

Writing Letters to Editors About AIG’s Creation “Museum”

Even if you are not eligible to sign this statement, there are lots of ways to support good science education. For example, if your local newspapers cover the AIG “museum,” be sure to respond to any inaccurate representations. Write a letter to the editor!

List of Current Signatories Addressing AIG’s Creation “Museum”

Scientsts and faculty concerned about scientifically inaccurate exhibits at the Creation Museum in Petersburg, Kentucky, operated by Answers in Genesis, a fundamentalist Christian ministry.

Kentucky, Ohio and Indiana Institutions Represented Addressing AIG’s Creation “Museum”

The statement of concern has been signed by scientists from the institutions below.

Please note: This list is provided for reference only. It does not imply endorsement by the institutions listed.
 

Scientific Inaccuracies at AIG’s Creation “Museum”

Parents, educators, scientists, clergy, and other citizens are concerned about scientifically inaccurate exhibits at the Creation Museum in Petersburg, Kentucky, operated by Answers in Genesis, a fundamentalist Christian ministry.

The statement below has been prepared by and for scientists in Kentucky, Ohio, and Indiana. Please feel free to sign if you are a scientist (faculty or post-doctoral level) from these states. And please circulate this statement among your colleagues.