Climate Change

Climate Change Education: Tips for Writing a Public Letter

Self-portrait, by Samuel van Hoogstraten

Even with the decreasing importance of print media, letters to the editor of your local newspaper are a good way to help to defend climate change education. Following are a few time-tested principles for writing effective letters to the editor.

Climate Change Education: Testifying Before Policymakers

A controversy over climate change education may involve a public hearing before policymakers — a meeting of a local school board or of a legislative committee, for example. Following are a few time-tested principles for effectively testifying before policymakers.

Polls on Climate Change

There are many polls on public understanding and acceptance of climate change, and a few on students and educators as well.  For an indepth analysis of teacher understanding and acceptance of climate change, see NCSE's 2016 report on climate change education.  For other information, see the links below.

Mixed Messages: How Climate Change is Taught in America's Public Schools

Mixed Messages: How Climate Change is Taught in America's Public Schools (pdf), a detailed report of the first nationwide survey of climate change education in the United States, conceived and funded by NCSE and conducted in collaboration with researchers at Pennsylvania S

Willing To Fight: Mike Mann on Climate Action and Education

In November 2009, the climate research community was hit by a hurricane: a cache of thousands of personal e-mails was released, with passages wrenched out of context to make climate science seem petty, insular, and unscientific. At Penn State, where I was in my second year as a Ph.D. student, “Climategate” got ugly fast, because Penn State’s own Michael E. Mann was at the heart of the manufactured controversy.

RNCSE: Volume 36: No 1 Winter 2016

In this issue, we have an interview with climate scientist, Michael Mann, updates on the latest flare-ups of anti-science education activity across the country (and abroad), news on our teacher network and science booster club, and more!

Resolution: No Nonscience in Tennessee Science Classes

WHEREAS [name of district / board] agrees with the Tennessee General Assembly’s view, expressed in the preamble to Tenn. Code Ann. § 49-6-1030, that “[a]n important purpose of science education is to inform students about scientific evidence and to help students develop critical thinking skills necessary to become intelligent, productive, and scientifically informed citizens,” and

Text of the Monkey Law - HB 368/SB 893

HOUSE BILL 368 By Dunn
AN ACT to amend Tennessee Code Annotated, Title 49, Chapter 6, Part 10, relative to teaching scientific subjects in elementary schools.

WHEREAS, the general assembly finds that:

(1) An important purpose of science education is to inform students about
scientific evidence and to help students develop critical thinking skills necessary to become intelligent, productive, and scientifically informed citizens;

Background on Tennessee's 21st Century Monkey Law

In 2012, Tennessee’s legislature enacted a 21st century "Monkey Law," a law opening the state’s science classrooms to lessons in creationism, climate change denial, and other nonscience.

Take action on Tennessee's Monkey Bill

When Tennessee's legislature debated a "Monkey Bill" in 2012, NCSE joined with concerned citizens to protect science classes. The bill's text singles out evolution and climate change, as if those topics were scientifically controversial, and it blocks school administrators from maintaining a consistent curriculum. It opens the door for creationist parents or students to disrupt classrooms, or for teachers who deny the basic science of climate change to present pseudoscience.