News

05.09.2002
On May 9, Francisco J. Ayala, Donald Bren Professor of Biological Sciences at the University of California, Irvine, was named by President Bush to receive the National Medal for Science, the nation’s highest award for lifetime achievement in scientific research. Ayala will receive the medal at a ceremony at the White House on June 13. As the National Science Foundation’s citationist wrote, “Ayala has revolutionized evolution theory by pioneering molecular biology in the investigation of evolutionary processes.
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05.08.2002
At a black-tie dinner in Washington DC on May 7, 2002, Eugenie C. Scott, executive director of NCSE, was presented with the 2002 National Science Board Public Service Award. The National Science Board is the governing board of the National Science Foundation.
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04.30.2002
Lawrence Krauss, chair of the Physics Department at Case Western Reserve University, and recent recipient of the American Association for Advancement of Science Award for Public Understanding of Science, appears in the April 30, 2002, New York Times.

In the editorial Krauss takes aim at believers in UFOs, young-earth creationism, and advocates of intelligent design.
See the New York Times.
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04.25.2002
The web site of Actionbioscience.org, described as a “non-commercial, educational web site created and managed by BioScience Productions, Inc. to promote bioscience literacy,” features an excerpt from the April 2, 2002, issue of Natural History. (Updated October 13, 2004: Actionbioscience.org is now an education resource of the American Institute of Biological Sciences and no longer associated with BioScience Productions, Inc.)

The posting consists of brief position statements by three leading proponents of intelligent design (ID), and three accompanying rebuttals.
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04.15.2002
On January 21, 2002 HB 888 and HB 1101 were introduced in the Mississippi House of Representatives and referred to the Education Committee. Both bills had the same sponsor, and both died in committee on February 5.
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04.12.2002
On February 26, 2002 House Bill 1563 was introduced in the Georgia House of Representatives and referred to the Education Committee. No action has been taken on this bill to date, and April 12 is expected to be the last day of the current legislative session.

The wording of HB 1563 resembles the "Santorum amendment" to last year's federal education bill, which was removed in conference committee. The phrasing matches the common rhetoric of such evolution opponents as intelligent design creationists. The relevant portion HB 1563 reads:
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04.10.2002
On April 9, 2002 the Board of Education of the Liberty J-4 School District voted 5-0 against a proposal to include creationism in its science classes. Located in Joes, Colorado, about 150 miles east of Denver, the district serves just over 100 students.

On March 12 the board had voted unanimously to include creationism. Local residents contacted NCSE requesting information about “creation science” and the legal consequences of the board’s proposal.
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04.08.2002

NCSE is pleased to see that the Center for Renewal of Science and Culture (CRSC) has begun taking steps to correct the error in the article posted on its web site concerning the March 11, 2002 Ohio Board of Education meeting.

Fred Hutchison claims that the papers in the CRSC bibliography delivered to the Ohio BOE were written by “intelligent design scientists.” This is incorrect.

The CRSC has posted an editor’s comment above the article highlighting the error, but did not correct the error in the text of the article itself.
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04.06.2002
At the Ohio Board of Education meeting held March 11th, 2002, Center for Renewal of Science and Culture (CRSC) Director Stephen Meyer and CRSC Senior Fellow Jonathan Wells presented the board with a bibliography of forty four papers published in peer reviewed scientific literature.
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04.05.2002
In a fifteen-page analysis sent earlier this week to every member of the Ohio Board of Education, the National Center for Science Education exposed the Discovery Institute’s “Bibliography of Supplementary Resources for Ohio Science Instruction” as a systematic misrepresentation of the scientific literature that it cites.
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