Anti-Evolution

12.12.2017

HuffPost logoA new study suggests that textbooks that miseducate students about evolution and climate change may be in wide use in private schools that receive public funding through voucher or tax-credit schemes, according to Rebecca Klein in a lengthy article in the Huffington Post (December 7, 2017).

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12.01.2017

"A controversial new state law that makes it easier for Florida residents to challenge books used in public schools could get overhauled next year so those who dislike certain texts could also suggest replacements they find more appropriate," reports the Orlando Sentinel (December 1, 2017).

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11.29.2017

Florida's House Bill 825, prefiled on November 28, 2017, would, if enacted, require "[c]ontroversial theories and concepts ... [to] be taught in a factual, objective, and balanced manner," while allowing local school districts to use either the state science standards or alternatives "equivalent to or more rigorous than" them.

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11.28.2017

The effects of Florida's new law making it easier for creationists and climate change deniers to harass their local school districts are already manifesting, according to a report from the Associated Press (November 18, 2017). 

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11.27.2017

Thanks in part to NCSE's efforts, it was a bad year for those who would make it easier to miseducate kids about science, with one major exception: Florida. Signed into law in June 2017, Florida's House Bill 989 allows any county resident—not just any parent with a child in the country's public schools—to file a complaint about textbooks and other instructional materials. Climate change and evolution were clearly among the targets of HB 989.

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11.20.2017

Florida's Senate Bill 966, prefiled on November 17, 2017, would, if enacted, require "[c]ontroversial theories and concepts ... [to] be taught in a factual, objective, and balanced manner," while allowing local school districts to use either the state science standards or alternatives "equivalent to or more rigorous than" them.

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11.14.2017

New Mexico is now officially the nineteenth state to have adopted the Next Generation Science Standards. 

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11.02.2017

On November 2, 2017, the Utah state board of education voted 10-4 to begin the process of revising the state science standards for elementary and high school — albeit "[o]ver objections that national science education standards push a political agenda on global warming and do not include instruction of intelligent design as a counterpoint to teaching evolution," according to the Deseret News (November 2, 2017).

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10.26.2017

"After facing an onslaught of opposition, New Mexico's Public Education Department officials on Wednesday decided to adopt the Next Generation Science Standards 'in their entirety,'" the Albuquerque Journal (October 25, 2017), reports.

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10.19.2017

After a public hearing in Santa Fe in which the flawed science standards for New Mexico were consistently opposed, the Public Education Department is promising to restore part of the removed content on evolution, the age of the earth and climate change — but important concerns remain.

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