NCSE News / Anti-Evolution Actions Alert

01.24.2007

Mississippi's House Bill 625, introduced by Representative Mike Lott (R-District 104) on January 9, 2007, and referred to the House Committee on Education, would provide, if enacted, "The school board of a school district may allow the teaching of creationism or intelligent design in the schools within the district.

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01.10.2007

The Associated Press (January 9, 2007) reports [Link broken], "The new moderate majority on the Kansas Board of Education plans to vote next month on new science testing standards, moving more quickly than anticipated to dump anti-evolution guidelines that made the state an object of international ridicule." The anti-evolution state science standards, adopted by the board in November 2005 under the guidance of local "intelligent design" activists and over the protests of the state'

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01.04.2007

Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility -- "a national non-profit alliance of local, state and federal scientists, law enforcement officers, land managers and other professionals dedicated to upholding environmental laws and values" -- is charging the National Park Service with stalling on a promised review of a creationist book sold at the bookstores at Grand Canyon National Park.

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01.02.2007

The historian of creationism Ronald L. Numbers was interviewed (free site pass required) by Salon (January 2, 2007). His interviewer, Steve Paulson, summarizes: "Numbers says much of what we think about anti-evolutionism is wrong. For one thing, it's hardly a monolithic movement. There are, in fact, fierce battles between creationists of different stripes.

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01.02.2007

After Selman v. Cobb County, the case that challenged the constitutionality of a textbook warning sticker that described evolution as "a theory, not a fact," was remanded to the trial court, the legal team for the plaintiffs recruited three expert witnesses for the possible retrial: McGill University's Brian Alters and Brown University's Kenneth R. Miller, both of whom served as expert witnesses in Kitzmiller v. Dover, as well as NCSE's executive director Eugenie C. Scott. The case was settled, so there will be no need for their testimony.

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12.21.2006

Newspapers in Georgia are hailing the settlement in Selman v. Cobb County, the case that challenged the constitutionality of a textbook warning sticker that described evolution as "a theory, not a fact." The plaintiffs won the trial, but on appeal the verdict was vacated, due primarily to concerns about the evidence, and remanded to the trial court for further proceedings.

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12.19.2006

There is a settlement in Selman v. Cobb County, the case that challenged the constitutionality of a textbook disclaimer sticker that described evolution as "a theory, not a fact." In 2002, the Cobb County Board of Education, pressured by local creationists, adopted the stickers, and eleven parents subsequently filed suit, with a trial following in late 2004.

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12.15.2006

"Pay a visit to the Biologic Institute and you are liable to get a chilly reception," Celeste Biever wrote in New Scientist (December 15, 2006).

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12.14.2006

Writing in the Guardian (December 13, 2006), James Randerson evaluates the recent attempts of creationists to sabotage evolution education in Britain's public schools.

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