A fossil

It’s the goniatid—or if you prefer the goniatite—Imitoceras rotatorium, and what’s not to love? Stephanie Keep recently told you about the collective NCSE fondness for cephalopods, and goniatites are cephalopods found in the fossil record from the Devonian to the end of the Permian; they resemble their later cousins the ammonites.

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A fossil

Again with the swirliness! But it’s not a summer repeat of the edrioasteroid. What, then, is it? If you think you know the answer, write it on a postcard or a scanning superconducting quantum interference device microscope—you can never have too many, right?—and mail it to NCSE, 1904 Franklin Street, Suite 600, Oakland CA 94612. Or just leave a comment below.

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Mm ... swirly ...Not as cuddly as a bunny, but cute nevertheless, it’s Streptaster! One of the Edrioasteroidea, a class of echinoderm, Streptaster “is distinguished by the very high, long, and strongly curved ambulacra, all of which curve counterclockwise,” as the University of Georgia Stratigraphy Lab notes.

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