“Silly,” “comically short,” “feeble,” “itty-bitty,” “teeny-tiny,” “useless,” and “wimpy” are not generally phrases you’d associate with a fearsome predator, but they are just some of the adjectives science writers used to describe one of the fiercest of the fierce—T. rex … or its arms, anyway. And now there is a new dino on the block with similarly disproportional arms. What if anything does it mean, evolutionarily, that there are now two predators with tiny arms? 

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The other week The Washington Post’s Speaking of Science blog addressed the question: “Dear Science: Why aren’t apes evolving into humans?”

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In Part 1, we learned about the discovery of crazy toxic newts and their crazy-toxin-resistant prey.

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It appears I’m in the mood for classics lately…or maybe it’s the researchers who are? I recently took to the blog to discuss the discovery of the jumping gene mutation responsible for turning white peppered moths black. Right on its heels has come another insight into the mutations responsible for yet another classic evolution case study.

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This blog installment focuses on perhaps the most well known example of natural selection in action (and a topic we have covered in the blog before): The peppered moth (Biston betularia).

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