So I’m skimming through the latest issue of the Institute for Creation Research’s monthly publication, Acts & Facts, chuckling over the convoluted treatment of ice ages (short story: they’re real, only the advances and contractions of the four Northern Hemispheric glaciers were really zippy, taking only a few hundred years) and other scientific zaniness, when a commentary caught my eye.

+ read

At the public hearings on textbook adoption at the Texas Board of Education on September 17, there was an exchange that deserves to be noted. I mean, there were plenty of noteworthy exchanges, but most of the rest of them were on the crazy side. But this particular exchange deserves to be noted because at first glance, it might seem easy which side to support. Whereas upon reflection, the other side is actually the more valid position.

+ read

While listening on Tuesday to the Texas State Board of Education hearings on the adoption of science textbooks, I couldn’t help but think, “There they go again”, as citizens extolled that:

+ read

Wednesday night was retirement celebration night for NCSE friend Judy Scotchmoor at the University of California Museum of Paleontology. The education director (or to give her full title, Assistant Director for Outreach and Education) at UCMP for decades, Judy has made UCMP a model for academic outreach to teachers throughout her career.

+ read