I don’t know how to say this word, so I’m just going to pretend that I know how to say it.

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In part 1, I looked at the phenomenon of the Great Unconformity, a gap between Grand Canyon layers that spans more than a quarter of Earth’s history. Though geologists understand how unconformities like this occur, creationists have a rather different view about what formed the Great Unconformity.

Steve Austin, the dean of Grand Canyon creationist geologists, writes in the book Grand Canyon: Monument to Catastrophe:

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Visitors to Grand Canyon gaze awestruck at vermillion rock layers stacked like plates, one after another from rim to gorge, an endless parade of Earth’s history basking in the fierce Arizona sun. Beholding Grand Canyon can really make you stop and think. You think of how the expanse of time represented by those layers dwarfs the pitiful few score years we are privileged to meander the surface.

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09.30.2014

In addition to running the Creation Museum in Kentucky, Ken Ham writes a blog. I regularly read this blog because it provides me with a joyful cornucopia of mirth as well as unintentional revelations about how creationists think. Reading it is like eavesdropping on a conversation from an alternate universe.

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“In every outthrust headland, in every curving beach, in every grain of sand there is the story of the earth.”

―Rachel Carson, “Our Ever-Changing Shore”

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